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Equality & Diversity

Learning Disabilities Week at Admiral – Our Colleagues’ Stories

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Blog

** DEFAULT postresults.publishdate - en-GB **

14/06/2021

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We are very proud to be a diverse workplace and one way we can continue this is through the work of our Diversity and Inclusion (D&I) working groups.Our fantastic Disability Workstream are joining the national ‘Learning Disabilities Week’ to further our goal of becoming an even more diverse and inclusive workplace for all. It follows the success of our recent Diversity and Inclusion Week. Learning Disabilities Week will involve an array of educational workshops, podcasts, as well as competitions and reading materials, to educate our colleagues and showcase the help and assistance available to those who need it.    Whether it be a congenital disability from birth, something that’s been brought on by an injury, or a condition that’s developed over time, it’s important we learn and raise awareness. We believe that having a disability shouldn’t be a barrier to anyone achieving their full potential, and so we are committed to learning and understanding the experiences of our colleagues with disabilities.Read more about our culture and our commitment to diversity and inclusion.  As well as physical disabilities, we’ll also be raising awareness on neurodiversity, some of the traits of which, are listed below: ·       Dyslexia  ·       Dyspraxia (also known as DCD)  ·       Dyscalculia  ·       ADD  ·       ADHD  ·       Autism   ·       Epilepsy  ·       Tics   What’s neurodiversity?  Neurodivergent simply means someone who thinks differently from the way the majority (referred to as neurotypical) expect. Being neurodivergent simply means your brain functions, learns and processes information differently than others.  Did you know that Neurodiverse individuals represent at least 1 in 10 of the adult population? If we put that into perspective of Admiral, it means that 800 of our colleagues could be neurodiverse.   We work hard to support our all our people and have many different ways to help. Colleagues can contact the Workplace Support Team confidentially and they will provide more information about the options available to assist and support. We’re proud to help with some of those we’ve helped have provided testimonials:   Holly – Admiral Academy Trainer I’ve worked for Admiral for over 8 years now, but I’ve only understood what my neurodiverse labels are for 2 years. I was participating in my masters, supported by Admiral, when I was diagnosed through my university as dyspraxic with attentional deficits and challenges. I think that’s a fancy way of saying I may have ADHD but they can’t definitively say as they didn’t specifically test for it. While I have always known that I learn and process information differently than others, my diagnosis was the ‘ahhh ha!’ moment that answered a lot of questions. It’s a strength that has enabled me to be successful as a Trainer in Admiral Law and now within our Central Training function. Admiral has always supported me in utilising my strengths in developing others to grow and succeed. The fact that I view and perceive things differently is valued because I might find other opportunities or solutions, or spot challenges that others wouldn’t have considered. My manager has supported me in developing my strengths and always listens and offers support with any challenges I experience. I’m happy sharing this part of myself with the business, and it means that I’ve been able to train and support other colleagues with neurodiversity understand more about themselves. This is one of the things that makes Admiral a great place to work! Shelly – Claims I have worked for Admiral for just under 3 years in various roles across the business, I was open about my Dyslexia from the beginning in the hope Admiral would help me achieve my full potential. I am so grateful for the support I have received, from specialist software and additional training, to a management team who encouraged me to be the best I can be. Admiral focus on my strengths encouraging me to shine in these areas, enabling me to feel confident at work, I also feel able to ask for help when I may struggle with certain tasks. One my favourite things about Admiral is there are many working groups you can join to help others and share your story, such as the internal Podcast we are making on Neurodiversity. As a young girl who struggled to write, to a woman who is confident to type, I am proud to be open about my daily battle with dyslexia.   Cara – IT Training I’m reasonably new to the Admiral family – I’ve been here for a year and half and 2 (very) different roles.  I was diagnosed with dyslexia, dyspraxia and VPD (visual processing disorder) or more commonly known as visual straining, with OCD tendencies, 4 years ago through my University (that was a mouthful). I have also found there was certain things I was really bad at whilst other things I will learn once and never forget.  I’m extremely clumsy and continuously lost and getting a diagnosis was really self-soothing for me. I had never heard of half the things I was diagnosed with, so it was really comforting that I received such great aftercare and explanations.  This role was the first time I felt confident disclosing my diagnoses due to the accepting nature of the company.  I have received fantastic assistance from People Services Executives (HR representatives) and we are moving in the right direction with acknowledgment from management. Falling into a technical role has been a godsent as it’s always been a strength of mine and now I am developing as a Trainer, using my diagnoses to think and train differently. So grateful to have found a company that will work with my diagnoses and not brush it under the rug.Joseph – Claims I have been working for Admiral for just over a year and a half. I was diagnosed with dyspraxia or DCD when I was 5 years old and during my career at Admiral, I have had many struggles but through support and hard work I have managed to overcome most problems.I work on the Third-Party Hire Team dealing with fault claims and liaising with representatives from Credit Hire, Accident Management companies, etc.Since starting in Admiral, I have been supported by my Team Manager and had a Works Needs Assessment to help adapt the way I work. I now have Claro Read software that helps break down chunky letters, and my manager has made me lots of process guides to follow, which have been a great help.I love that Admiral is such an inclusive workplace. Charlotte – Customer Loyalty My experience so far has been great - I have been open and honest about my neurodiversity since my application and within my first week had chats with our Workplace Support to see what support is available. Everyone has been understanding and accommodating - which is rare - a lot of neurodiverse people don't disclose that about themselves because it is often seen as a weakness or a hassle to deal with, or an excuse to get out of certain duties. Admiral have been wonderful, and I am only a couple of weeks into my journey.

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Linzi Mullane

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Linzi Mullane

Linzi Mullane

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Linzi Mullane

Women in Admiral Tech: Career defining moments

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Admiral Tech

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Blog

** DEFAULT postresults.publishdate - en-GB **

03/06/2021

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We asked our female colleagues, “What has been your career defining moment during your time in the tech industry that you are most proud of?”. Cara Mark: Chapter Lead In 2020, I was a guest speaker at the Big Data conference in London, to discuss the success of Admiral’s Data Warehouse. This was a scary thing to do! Thousands of people from all over the world attend this conference every year, and I knew that I would have to speak to a room holding a couple of hundred of them. As I was walking around the stands, chatting to others from around the industry, another female guest speaker told me that she had seen me in the program, and that only 16% of speakers at the conference were female! That was a defining moment for me to realise how proud I was to be representing this shockingly low representation of females in this industry, and how much we should encourage women to work in tech! It’s a great place to be for a female and the numbers are moving in the right direction.   Maria Richards: InfoSec Product Manager/Business Analyst I studied as a mature student whilst in full-time employment and pregnant with my daughter. The HNC in Software Engineering had very few female students and had a high dropout rate. I was the only female that graduated on the course in that year, whilst receiving distinction grades in many of my modules. Before receiving my exam results, I had already secured my 1st IT role. From this, I have built a successful career in IT for the last 23 years. This was the turning point in my career.   Shweta Rajput: Junior Developer - IT Training Scheme My career in IT is only just beginning, so securing a position on the IT Training Scheme was probably the biggest defining moment. I have been given an opportunity to learn the ins and outs of a career in tech and I’m looking forward to becoming a fully-fledged developer.   Lisa Petryszyn-Edwards: Technical Security Consultant Much of my time before joining Admiral was spent leading Operational and Development teams. However, I took a keen interest in Security and very much led in this area. In 2018, I was given an opportunity to work as a Security Designer, using my knowledge of Operational and Delivery challenges and working with the teams closely to implement security controls. This was a defining change for me as it led me on to start my OU Master’s degree in Cyber Security and I stepped away from leading large teams and focused more on the Cyber arena.     Susan Massay: Domain Lead - Tactical ETL Oh wow! I have so many amazing moments throughout my years in Admiral. I guess the most career defining moment would be when I went from a very technical role as a Telecoms Specialist to a Management role. The support structure that was put in place to achieve this and change my career path was phenomenal and allowed me to progress into the role and achieve several management rewards.   Aisha Arshad: Data Warehouse Developer When I joined Admiral, I didn’t have any experience working on DWH systems that are used here. I was fortunate to be put straight onto a project to build from scratch. Each squad of work was made of two Developers and a Tester. Halfway through the project, the second Developer was reassigned to work on a different project. Despite the systems being relatively new to me, I successfully completed a large proportion of the project alone. This is something I am extremely proud of.   Meg Collis: Head of IT Delivery Early on in my career I worked for a well-known Telco. I was asked to design and implement a technical call centre out in Egypt. This was back at a time when offshoring was limited, and Egypt wasn’t a popular destination for this type of work. The delivery was a success and I worked and lived out in Egypt for a further 12 months whilst the centre ramped. I believe the company is still out there now actually which is good to know that it remains a key part of the strategy. I also made some lifelong connections that I am still in touch with now.   Kimberley Luke: IT Delivery Manager I studied as an 18-year-old for a degree in Pure Maths, having no real idea of what I would do with it. However, jumping onto a reputable Graduate Scheme was the best thing I could have done! That was just the start, after working my way through a few roles in a large Financial Services company, I moved to a very ‘old school’ large Retail company to continue with my career. After a few roles to prove myself, my main career defining moment was achieving my role as the only female, and youngest, IT Development Manager in the company! Since then, I’ve been lucky enough to not experience age and gender being an issue for me, my reputation has spoken far louder.   May Wong: Data Shared Service Squad Lead I joined Admiral as a Developer in the Data Warehouse team, working with the Telematics Data team and six months later joined the Central Data Warehouse. I have been involved in various projects and most recently worked on Programme NEO as a Developer, additionally taking on the role of Scrum Master. The experience I have gained from this opportunity, has resulted in me successfully progressing to the role of Squad Lead. Therefore, the opportunities made available to me by Admiral, as a female in Tech, would be my career highlight.     Lara Court: Head of Business Service I’ve been lucky enough to work for Admiral for 25 years. It’s very difficult to pick one career defining moment because during my time in the IT Department, I’ve been given the opportunity to work in a wide variety of roles whilst progressing my career. What makes me proud is that Admiral offers those opportunities and I have been able to make the most of them.   Click here to view our current opportunities in Tech.

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Valvanuz Guerrero-Perez

Valvanuz  Guerrero-Perez

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Valvanuz Guerrero-Perez

It’s Diversity and Inclusion Week at Admiral!

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General

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Blog

** DEFAULT postresults.publishdate - en-GB **

17/05/2021

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Diversity and Inclusion is an important topic for all of us at Admiral.  We have a workplace that welcomes everyone irrespective of their background or ethnicity and we are working hard to remove any barriers to entry that may exist and ensuring that we create opportunities for everyone to develop.  However, we need to do more and make Admiral a truly diverse and inclusive workplace so that we can attract, nurture and retain the very best talent.  We need diverse thinkers to challenge us, it will help us make better and more informed decisions and ultimately ensures our customers get the best products and services. Diversity is a broad topic covering a range of characteristics: gender, ethnicity, sexual orientation, disability, age, and social background. In the Financial Services sector, all these groups are under-represented, and experience pay gaps when compared to society as a whole. We’re proud to have a strong performance in Diversity and Inclusion and that is why we’re different - We are proud to observe near equal representation of men and women across the whole businessWe have a low gender pay gap. You can read more in our Annual Diversity Report   9% of Admiral staff identify as LGBTQ+ compared with 2.2% for the UK population Admiral’s UK BAME percentage is broadly in line with the economically active population within our geographic demographic (6.9% vs 8.7%) We are committed to delivering even greater diversity within the business and are hosting our very first Diversity and Inclusion week, to not only raise awareness of all the great work our Diversity groups (Age, BAME, Gender, LGBT, Disability and Social Mobility) have achieved to date, but also, what we have planned in the months and years ahead. The week will be filled with various activities, webinars, talks, videos, and lots more.  There'll be opportunities for everyone to get involved, we have: A fascinating Q&A with Cristina Nestares, Admiral UK CEO, on why Diversity and Inclusion is important to us at Admiral, and what our key targets are.BAME leader Gurmeet Singh will talk about how Diversity and Inclusion plays a part in Admiral’s success and gives us some great advice for the future. Charlotte Bennett, Neo Director and Diversity and Inclusion representative will talk about imposter syndrome and the importance of taking on any challenge headfirst.Laura Pengilly, Internal Careers Manager, along with guest speakers, will talk about internal opportunities, including our talent programmes and the more conventional route of applying for roles via our intranet. This session is to support those wishing to take the next step in their Admiral career! Nik Miller from the Bridge Group and a selection of Senior Managers from around the business discuss ‘’who gets ahead and why?’’. The panel explore challenges for progression within the Financial sector and how we at Admiral are tackling this head on. Our UK and International Heads of Diversity and Inclusion discuss the great work and key achievements across the group, and we get a glimpse of what the future of Diversity and Inclusion in Admiral will look like, globally! Matt Wintle, Head of Learning and Development and Déborah De Paola, Learning and Development Manager will be sharing their mentoring plans for the next 12 months! Learn more about Diversity and Inclusion at Admiral.

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Linzi Mullane

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Linzi Mullane

Part time working: attaining balance in different areas improves performance in all areas.

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Admiral Pioneer

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Blog

** DEFAULT postresults.publishdate - en-GB **

26/03/2021

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For me, part time working boils down to a simple philosophy: attaining balance in different areas improves performance in all areas – Gunnar Peters, CEO Veygo. So, who am I?   I’m German, born and raised, and came across the channel before Abitur (German equivalent of A-levels) to experience a new culture and actually learn English (some may question when this will actually start). I met a girl and, after a few years’ long distance, found myself engaged and heading back to the UK to study Maths at Cardiff University. I quickly fell in love with Wales and Cardiff and decided this was where I wanted to settle. My life in Admiral started as a Pricing Programmer in 2008 and I worked my way up in different functions like New Products, part of large-scale programmes, IT and much more. As you can probably tell by now, I never had a clear vision of what I wanted to do – this continues to the present day. I essentially always wanted to find something that I was good at and then making sure that I like it, not the other way round. My latest adventure is leading Mobility within Admiral Pioneer. I am part of the Admiral Pioneer Leadership team, which is really exciting as we bring the best talent across different industries together to concept and launch new ventures. Mobility is currently synonymous with Veygo, which I have been heading up for nearly a year now. However, Mobility will be broader than Veygo and insurance as we explore electric vehicles, ride sharing, green fleet and mobility as a service. It has its own setup and functional organisation and operates as its own business, which is exciting and we have some very ambitious goals.  In spring 2017, I made the decision that I wanted to go back to University and do a Msc in Applied Statistics. Admiral was kind enough to support this, even though it meant that I would only be in the office for 4 days a week for most of the year, during exam periods even less so. Between deciding on and starting the Applied Statistics course, I applied for the role of Head of Telematics (also known by many as Black Box Insurance), taking over a team of 20 and the Profit and Loss account responsibilities for the product. My 4-day week was acknowledged and supported throughout the interview process and so I started a new role in the same summer as I went back to school after 10 years of no formal education. The following 2 years taught me that being busier than ever before can be energising! Strangely, the stress of one took away from the pressure of the other. It provided me space away from work and thus perspective. It also helped my team. They knew when I was not in the office and knew that they did not have to run everything past me. Being in the office 4 days a week provided a weird sense of clarity between us all. Reflecting on this time, I realise that this helped the team feel more empowered. The one day out of the office means that the team had to step up to fill the void on those occasions, which I believe enabled them to have increased exposure in the business and to develop their own abilities while knowing that support was available at the end of the phone if they needed it. Several of my direct reports have themselves been promoted into other roles, which would suggest that this process has helped us all. Everybody who knows me also knows that I struggle to switch off, my mind is always going, and I work very hard. But I have learned the hard way that just like when you work out in the gym too hard for too long, you need recovery periods to continue to perform at the same level over a long time. A 3-day weekend gives additional recovery time and a chance to recharge to bring more energy to the working week. So, in autumn 2019 I asked to formally go to 4 days, while reducing my hours to 90%. It also means I am more present for my 2 children and can actually be of real help with the childcare duties. I have now been promoted twice since working a 4-day week and it has had multiple benefits to me, my team and family: ·       I work hard and, whereas I previously worked myself towards burnout when things got tough, now there is an energy buffer that enables me to step up and carry the team in these moments. Working 4 days gives me enough time to recharge and be there, really there, for my team. ·       The extra day also gives me the time to develop myself further. Doing an Msc and creating real space for a coach and mentor to make the most of their valuable input rather than trying to squeeze this in. Having a day off allows time to digest wider reading and previous conversations, allowing space for creative solutions to present themselves in a way that rarely happens in a day packed with meetings. ·       The team has more obvious opportunity to step up: delegation is necessary, not an option. This gives development opportunities and empowers the team. Did I mention that many of my direct reports are succeeding in their careers too? ·       My Children and wife have more quality time with me (mind you, they may see this as a negative) ·       My wife has more freedom because I pick up more of the childcare burden and as a result has taken on additional responsibilities in work. ·       I keep my lightness and unique character for work and home equally, reducing the risk of mood swings. Admiral have even set up a new initiative to embrace new Ways of Working (WoW) that give even more flexibility in where and how we can work. The idea will be for our business to run in a hybrid working environment with people at home and people in the office at the same time. There will be a lot of testing and learning as we go, but it’s a really exciting project and I’m looking forward to seeing the changes that are made in the future. If you consider reducing your hours, working different times to others or dropping a day here is some advice from me: Understand why you want to do it. How will it benefit you, your family, your team, your career? Creating this clarity will help you feel confident enough to ask. There is still a stigma that reducing your hours or the number of days you work means you are not ambitious, you want to step back, you are disengaged, etc. This stigma is likely internal as well as external: challenge the little voice in the back of your mind that doubts what can be achieved by part-timers! But if you understand why you are asking then you can tell a true story, you can ask with conviction and you know how you will measure the success of the change. If you decide, like me, to drop a day, make sure you drop it fully. No access to work! The team can always reach you on the phone if they truly need something from you, but otherwise, you are off. Do this for a few months as otherwise it is difficult to get the benefit you desire. And make sure you enjoy the day and achieve what you wanted to on that day. For me, it was self-development and doing the school runs to spend time with the kids. What is yours?

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Allison Martin

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Allison Martin

Allison Martin

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Allison Martin

A Day in the Life of a Senior Business Analyst at Admiral

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Admiral Tech

Content Type

Blog

** DEFAULT postresults.publishdate - en-GB **

29/12/2020

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We spoke to Kirsty Williams-Henry a Senior Business Analysis at Admiral who has worked for the company for over eight years. Here she tells us about her role and what it’s like for a woman in tech. Tell us about your career so far and what led you to a career in Technology? I would say I fell into my career in technology due to my love of all things tech from a young age: I was the first of my friends to have a PC and I used it for almost everything! I pursued my love of technology at college by doing an A-Level in computing where I was the only girl in a class of eight. I found that I had a natural flare for technology as it aligned with my love for problem solving and the logical way my brain works. I soon realised that technology was the future and I wanted to be a part of it! I went on to achieve a first-class degree in Computer Forensics at the University of Glamorgan. After graduating I became a coder and developer for a company that had forty-three men working there and me, alongside one other woman who was not in a tech-related role. After this I joined the IT Graduate Programme at Admiral where I have found a home for the past eight years. On the Graduate Programme I got to dip into lots of different roles and ended up as an IT Business Analyst, something I would never have imagined myself doing prior to the programme. What does a typical day in your role at Admiral look like?  No day at Admiral is typical! During a day at work lots of things could crop up, such as live bugs that might pull me away from other projects and diversify my day. Admiral is very good at allowing employees to try new things. Each day allows you to put a different hat on, you have a lot of freedom to explore. My day often involves meetings and discussions with Product Owners and Project Managers.  I need to be able to understand systems from their point of view and how they would be using them. This means I can explain things to them and put guides together to aid their understanding. Most of my time is spent with the Developers and Testers within my team. I translate the requirements from those on the business side of the company to those on the IT side, enabling problems to be solved. Attention to detail is key as a Business Analyst - the smallest of details must be correct for systems to function correctly. Admiral have also been great at flexible working: they have been very accommodating to me and my changing needs and have also been great at enabling us to work from home effectively during the pandemic. If you could begin your career path over, would you change anything? I would never change my job role; I love it and feel like it is a great fit for my skillset. If I had to change one thing it might be to investigate different areas of IT and more specifically IT Security as I find it an extremely interesting area. How does your work impact Admiral and its customers? My role as a Business Analysist means that I am involved in the business end-to-end. I meet those in business Operations to see the reality of how the technology that I work on is being used throughout the business, as well as any problems that might occur. From there, it is about them collectively working out what they may want from IT and the system and then it is translated into something that the IT team can take forward and work on. Being able to see how the changes really impact those working within the business services and the call centres of Admiral really inspires me to work harder and is one of the most rewarding parts of the job. Do you have any advice for women that want to start a career in Technology?  It can be difficult for those in Technology to put themselves into other people’s shoes whether it be the customers, those in call centres or those in business support areas, and I have found that the women in tech that I have worked with have been excellent at doing this. The language of development and IT can also be intimidating but I encourage people to spend a day with my team so that they can see that they would easily pick it up. No one should be afraid of Technology; anyone can do it if they give it a chance! I would advise women to find the part that interests them within Technology and run with it. For example, if you have a creative mindset, there are many creative elements to IT.  You need to be an artist to write code!

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Jessica Sutton

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Jessica Sutton

Jessica Sutton

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Jessica Sutton

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