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Who are Corporate Governance?

Our Corporate Governance team is made up of 70 talented individuals split across five key areas;

  • Audit
  • Compliance
  • Data Protection
  • Risk
  • Legal

We pride ourselves on being experts in our own fields, who come together to cover all aspects of Corporate Governance and mitigate the risks faced by the Group.

We are responsible for covering a wide range of roles all designed to ensure that the business operates within legal and ethical requirements in the eyes of shareholders, regulators and the wider community.

Internal Audit

Internal Audit makes sure the business is well-controlled across the board, providing an independent view on the appropriate identification and mitigation of risks across all categories. The work of Internal Audit provides assurance to the business that risks are adequately controlled and that governance processes are suitably robust. Along with this, Internal Audit are charged with identifying areas of added value that can improve the business. 

Compliance

The Compliance department is central to everything we do and manages the compliance risk of the business and completes the agreed annual compliance monitoring plan. Compliance initiatives are both forward-looking and reactive to regulatory developments. Working in Compliance will require you to work across the business, ensuring our processes are fully compliant and up-to-date. You’ll offer guidance and advice on FCA regulations and policies, and when it’s needed, you’ll help change the way we do things.

Data Protection

Regulation is updated frequently and it is the Data Protection team’s job to educate all levels of staff on privacy legislation and the rules they must comply with using their legal and technical knowledge and expertise. The team also manage Subject Access Requests (SAR), ensuring that records are kept orderly and that there is evidence that legal requirements have been met and carries out Privacy Impact Assessments. Data Protection jobs at Admiral also contribute to improvements in the functioning of the organisation’s risk management and control systems. They must understand operational processes and controls and assess their effectiveness in mitigating data protection risks. 

Legal 

Separate from our legal firm, Admiral Law, we have an in-house legal team. Our Legal team oversees all commercial and corporate legal matters, company secretary matters and manages the Admiral Group share schemes. Examples of the work of the Legal team are: contract negotiation, mergers and acquisitions, managing the Group’s intellectual property portfolio, commercial litigation, administering board meetings, managing share schemes.

Risk

The main function of the Risk department is to liaise with other parts of the business to capture, assess and log appropriate risk and near-miss events, efficiently and appropriately. The goal is to ensure that the impact on customers and financial losses are captured. By reviewing and monitoring risk and controls the team supports and develops the Operational Risk Framework and ensures processes remain appropriate and identifies improvement opportunities. The team also reviews the risk event log for common causes/themes and provides reports, as well as producing analysis on the risk and control environment and providing recommendations. Further to this, the team keeps up to date on current industry practices to implement change.

Jobs

Latest roles

Senior Group Risk Actuary

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Cardiff

Job Type

Full time

Department

Corporate Governance

Location

Cardiff

Office address

Tŷ Admiral, David Street, Cardiff, CF10 2EH

Description

About The Role This is a fantastic opportunity for a senior and experienced actuary to sit within the Actuarial and Financial Risk Team. We’re looking for an experienced actuary with a passion f

Reference

4700

Expiry Date

03/03/2021

Jessica Sutton

Vacancy managed by

Jessica Sutton
Jessica Sutton

Vacancy managed by

Jessica Sutton
View Shortlist
Personalisation Manager

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Cardiff

Job Type

Full time

Department

Business Support

Location

Cardiff

Office address

Tŷ Admiral, David Street, Cardiff, CF10 2EH

Description

Why Join Us? We are recruiting for a brand-new position in our Marketing department! This is an exciting opportunity for an experienced Personalisation Manager to join Wales’ only FTSE 100 company,

Reference

4795

Expiry Date

06/04/2021

Jessica Sutton

Vacancy managed by

Jessica Sutton
Jessica Sutton

Vacancy managed by

Jessica Sutton
View Shortlist
Software Engineer

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Cardiff

Job Type

Full time

Department

Business Support

Location

Cardiff

Office address

Tŷ Admiral, David Street, Cardiff, CF10 2EH

Description

  We’re looking for a Software Engineer with experience in Java and ideally with experience of using or development a document management system (such as Hyland OnBase or similar). You will have

Reference

4824

Expiry Date

09/04/2021

Valvanuz  Guerrero-Perez

Vacancy managed by

Valvanuz Guerrero-Perez
Valvanuz  Guerrero-Perez

Vacancy managed by

Valvanuz Guerrero-Perez
View Shortlist
View all jobs
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Posts

Admiral Life

Meeting our ex-Army employee - Matthew

Teaser

General

Content Type

Blog

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09/04/2021

Summary

We spoke to Matthew, who prior to joining us at Admiral, was in the Army for over eighteen years, serving in the 3rd Battalion of the Parachute Regiment. As you may know, Admiral signed the Armed Forces Covenant in 2019. We are committed to supporting reservists, ex-armed forces personnel and their families, both inside and outside of the workplace. Before coming to work at Admiral, Matthew was in the Army for over eighteen years. We caught up with him to hear more about his transition out of the Army and into Admiral… Could you tell us a bit more about your experiences in the army? I joined the Army at 15, right after I took my GCSEs. I thought I was the hardest kid in the world when I joined, but I found out I wasn’t! Honestly, I was a bit of a tear-away, and joining the Army did me a world of good. I had a really varied experience. I started out in the Coldstream Guards – wearing a red jacket and a furry hat outside Buckingham Palace, living in Westminster and then Chelsea barracks. One year, instead of taking part in the Trooping of the Colour, I decided to try out for P-Company. I was successful, got my wings, and joined 3 Para (3rd Battalion, Parachute Company). I saw a lot of conflict – Northern Ireland, the First Gulf War, Bosnia and Serbia, the Second Gulf War, Afghanistan. I had some good days, and some bad days; in the army your bad days are really bad. How did you find the transition out of the army? Transitioning was hard, but eventually I made the choice to leave and be with my family. Right before lockdown, I was a guest speaker at my children’s school, and one of the children asked me what the hardest thing about being in the Army was. I told them that physically it was P-Company selection, but that mentally the hardest thing was leaving. When I drove out of the camp for the last time, and realised it was all over, I pulled my car to the side of the road and cried my eyes out. I didn’t want to leave. The Army is more than a job, it becomes a massive part of your life. I was so young when I joined that there were things I had never had to do for myself before, like going to the doctors and getting a bus. Civvy street can be really overwhelming. After eighteen years, I was very institutionalized, and to an extent I probably will be for the rest of my life. The Army is a completely different world, and the transition out takes a lot of adjustment. Whilst I was in the Army, there were times where I thought I would prefer an office job, mainly to have a rest from running up and down mountains with my kit on. In reality, the transition to an office job was mind-numbing, and I wished I was back on those mountains. It took time, but I adjusted. That’s what they teach you in the Army - improvise, adapt and overcome, and that’s what I did. How did you come to work at Admiral? It took me a while to end up at Admiral. Straight after I left the Army, I worked in Close Protection and Counter Terrorism, which is a natural step for a lot of ex-servicemen. After a while, life events took over and I had to step away. I ended up in Technical Support for a while, and if I’m really honest, it wasn’t the job for me. I didn’t mind the job so much, but the place I worked was difficult. I’m based Swansea way, so I ran into lots of people who worked at Admiral, and I heard nothing but good things. When I first joined, I was shocked at how different it was to my old company. On my first day of training, when we were talking about car parking arrangements, I asked my manager a question about bringing a motorcycle to work. She told me that she didn’t know the answer, but that she’d find out. Within ten minutes, she got back to me with the information I needed. I remember being shocked. At the last place I’d worked I would ask a relevant question and most of the time, I’d never hear back. The level of communication at Admiral is similar to the Army, and it was really refreshing. How have you found working at Admiral? Honestly, it is rare to work for a company that supports you like Admiral does. I know that because Admiral isn’t the first company I have worked for since leaving the Army. I struggle with PTSD, but my Team Managers have always got behind me and supported me, even when I’m having a bad day. It’s quite easy for me to slip into the squaddie mentality of ‘I’m fine’, but I’ve worked a lot with People Services (HR) and they have given me the support that I need. It’s the first time since I’ve got out of the Army that I know I’m working for a company that supports me as much as they can and understands my situation. Civvy street can be really hard, and that’s why it is so important to know that you’re in a place where you will be looked after no matter what. That is what Admiral is for me. What are you up to at the moment? I currently work as a Customer Loyalty Representative. My role includes development, so I get to do some coaching within my team and the department which I really enjoy. I also spend time monitoring other peoples’ roles and improving our customer service. There is a lot of opportunity for progression at Admiral, and I am excited to be moving onwards and upwards, building another career for myself. What transferable skills do you feel the Army has given you? I think the biggest one is communication. In the Army, you’re constantly interacting with people you don’t know, so you really develop the skill of confident communication, which has definitely come in handy in my current role. Flexibility is another one. In the Army, there is a saying that you have Plan A and Plan B, but it’ll be Plan C that comes into play. And it’s true – there have been times when I have planned and trained for months, only for something to not happen. Similarly, having a sense of humour, because it keeps you grounded and helps you face any situation. In my current role, if things don’t go exactly to plan it doesn’t phase me, because I can keep things in perspective, find a solution, and move on. I suppose you could say it has made me more resilient. What do you enjoy most about working at Admiral? No one shouts around here and compared to other places I’ve worked that’s a real plus! Apart from that, there’s real variety in the people you speak to on the phones and I really enjoy interacting with customers. I’ve always believed that it’s worthwhile coming to work if you can help someone out, and make their life just a little bit easier, and in my current role I get to do that. One of the customers I spoke to the other day told me that I had made her day, and it’s the rewarding moments like that which make it enjoyable. That’s why I love my role and being a part of Admiral.

Teaser

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Valvanuz  Guerrero-Perez

by

Valvanuz Guerrero-Perez

Valvanuz  Guerrero-Perez

by

Valvanuz Guerrero-Perez

How to: Answer frequently asked interview questions.

Teaser

General

Content Type

Blog

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13/11/2020

Summary

"Tell us about yourself." Explain your previous roles, education, hobbies and interests and don’t forget to expand.  We want to know what these experiences have taught you. Elaborate on how you can use what you’ve learnt in the working environment. Be mindful not to overshare and keep it professional. "What are your weaknesses?"Pick a weakness relevant to the role you have applied for. Make sure to explain what you have done / are doing to improve in this area. Some people think picking a strength and spinning it to seem like a weakness will come across better, but it doesn’t feel honest and can insinuate you are not self-aware. It’s ok to be honest – none of us are the finished article. "What are your strengths?"Pick strengths that are relevant to the role and provide examples to support your answer.  Read the job advert beforehand and familiarise yourself with essential and desirable skills – this will help to ensure you’re showcasing the skills the recruiter is looking for. "What do you consider to be your greatest achievement?"If the interviewers don’t specifically ask for a ‘professional’ example, it’s OK to draw from personal experience, however, you should always make sure you’re able to relate it back to the role you are applying for.  The main thing to cover is why you are proud of this achievement, what it taught you and how it has prepared you for this role.  "Why do you want this job?"Show off your knowledge! The interviewer will want to know you’ve researched this role and the company.  You should know a fair bit about the role you’ve applied for – read the job advert, visit the career site and follow the company pages on social media platforms.  Explain what attracted you to this position.  You may wish to talk about the company benefits, the working environment, the opportunities and why you think you’ll be successful. "Where do you see yourself in five years?"Be honest and be realistic. If you want to progress that’s great, but suggesting you want to be the CEO within a few years might be unrealistic.  Think about the opportunities available to you in this role, not only will this show you’ve done your research, but it will also show that you are willing to work hard and are keen to progress.  If progression is not for you, that’s also fine.  You should explain how you plan to continue to do a great job and all the skills you have that will enable you to this. "Why do you want to leave your current job?"Be honest and be professional.  Be diplomatic in your answer and don’t forget you’re in an interview.  You may want to use this question as an opportunity to talk about the new role and why you are excited about the prospect of joining this company. "Why should we hire you?"This is your chance to set yourself apart from other applicants.   It’s tough to compare yourself to strangers but use this opportunity to talk about your strong work ethic, relevant skills and passion for the role.  Expand upon your answer and provide examples – this is usually one of the last questions in an interview and you don’t want to miss out on this last chance to impress the interviewers. "Do you have any questions?"Lots of people think they must ask a question at the end of an interview, but if the interviewers have been comprehensive in their explanation, then you might not have questions.  This is fine - don’t feel like you must think of something, but equally, make the most of this opportunity to discuss anything you’re unsure about. Here’s some of the questions we regularly get asked at the end of an interview:What do you like most about working for *insert company name here*?Would you like me to expand upon any of my answers or examples?Are there opportunities for training and development in this role/department?What would you say are the most challenging aspects of this role?What are the next steps of the process?

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Kyle Meacock

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Kyle Meacock

Kyle Meacock

by

Kyle Meacock